Home\About GenV\News and updates\Celebrating a better balance in medical research
Back Celebrating a better balance in medical research

Celebrating a better balance in medical research

Gender diversity in any workplace has many recognised benefits. On the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we celebrate our diverse GenV research team in leading the way to create a happier and healthier future for many children and parents.

The United Nations General Assembly declared 11 February the International Day of Women and Girls in Science in 2015. It promotes full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls, as well as gender equality across science, technology, engineering and mathematics  (STEMfields.

However, the gender gap sadly persists. According to UNESCO Institute of Statistics (UIS) data, less than 30 per cent of researchers worldwide are femaleIn Australia, it’s even less: in 2016, the Australian Government’s Office of the Chief Scientist highlighted that only 16% of STEMqualified people across the country are female.

At GenV, gender diversity in the workplace is a critical part of the future success of the projectwhich is one of the world’s largest-ever birth and parent cohort studiessaid Professor Melissa Wake, Scientific Director for GenV at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.

Amongst all the major research I’ve been involved with, GenV is the first to have a real gender mix across seniority and across skill sets. It mixes things up – how we think, how we negotiate, how we do.

Ensuring we have a diverse and forward-thinking research team that reflects our own community is so important to a project like GenV. Gender diversity will be part of the foundation for GenV’s success. “

“The work of our entire team – women, men, non-binary – helps to ensure that GenV really is for everyone – every baby born in the two-year window, every parent, and every community in VictoriaWe want to be sure that anyone who is interested in it can be part of itThen GenV can help speed up answers to the major issues facing children and adults, today and in the future,” she concluded.