Home\About GenV\News and updates\Spotlight on GenV\Generation Victoria lives up to its name
Back Generation Victoria lives up to its name

Generation Victoria lives up to its name

The GenV team love meeting families in maternity wards all across Victoria. And these maternity wards can sometimes demonstrate that it is a small world after all!

This was the experience of our field team member Barb in Warragul recently. Barb has been a midwife in Gippsland, and at other hospitals across Victoria, for many years and has now also joined the GenV team based at West Gippsland Healthcare Group (WGHG) in inviting local families to take part in GenV.

On Barb’s first day with GenV at WGHG, she signed up mum Christine, dad Daniel and newborn baby Angus to join GenV. But in a special connection, Barb had looked after Christine’s mum when Christine was born and had also cared for Christine when her eldest child Bridget was born.

Barb says having the opportunity to invite this family to take part in GenV on her very first day with the project, after previously being present for many of their special family milestones in the maternity ward, was very special.

Barb on the ward at West Gippsland Health service

“One of the things I love about GenV is the potential it offers – the outcomes really are only limited by the imagination and wondering of future generations of researchers.”

“Christine’s mother is a friend of mine. When Christine was born, I just happened to be on call and was there for her birth.

“Fast forward too many years to remember, when Christine was admitted the day before giving birth to her eldest child, I was on night duty and looked after her. And with the latest addition to the family, I didn’t get to look after them as a midwife, but Christine consented to be the first family I signed up for GenV. Such is the serendipity of living and working in a small community,” she said.

Barb said that GenV was an exciting project to be involved with and she loves having the opportunity to be involved in research after many happy years working as a midwife.

“One of the things I love about GenV is the potential it offers – the outcomes really are only limited by the imagination and wondering of future generations of researchers. To have such a large and varied cohort presents so much opportunity. And I love that there is a serious attempt to include everyone, including rural and regional-based families,” she said.

Pictured are father Daniel holding baby Angus, eldest child Bridget and mother Christine at their Jindivick dairy farm

“GenV will provide the opportunity to treat and prevent common and complex conditions for our community into the future.”

WGHG Director of Clinical Nursing, Trish O’Kelly, has previously welcomed the GenV research project involving families in West Gippsland.

“GenV will provide the opportunity to treat and prevent common and complex conditions for our community into the future,” she said.

Find out more about how families across the state can be a part of Generation Victoria: https://genv.org.au/for-parents/.