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Spotlight on Jason Cooper  

JUNE 2021

Spotlight on the ‘Humans of GenV’ 

A sophisticated research project like GenV has a great many talented and passionate people working behind the scenes to create a stronger approach to child and parent health and wellbeing in Victoria. 

In our ‘Humans of GenV’ spotlight series, we aim to share the stories of the people supporting this world-leading research project. 

Meet Jason Cooper
GenV team member at Frances Perry House and The Royal Women’s Hospital

I believe strongly in focusing upstream towards the root cause of contemporary health problems, and in emphasising prevention and early intervention approaches where possible.

“I am a Masters of Public Health graduate from the University of Melbourne and I also hold an undergraduate degree in Health Science. As a public health professional just starting out in my career, I aspire to contribute to research initiatives and knowledge translation projects which have the potential to advance positive changes in health, development and wellbeing outcomes for children and adultsHence the appeal of working on a project like GenV. 

 “My role with GenV involves me visiting the parents and guardians of newborn babies born at Frances Perry House and The Royal Women’s Hospital in Melbourne. I explain GenV, invite families to participate and facilitate some of the preliminary data collection.  

“I believe strongly in focusing upstream towards the root cause of contemporary health problems, and in emphasising prevention and early intervention approaches where possible. If we can do this across the public health and healthcare systems, as well as at the public and social policy level, we can limit problems occurring in the first place and optimise population health and quality of life outcomes right from the beginning. 

“I see GenV as an incredible opportunity to begin accelerating positive changes in how we both safeguard and optimise the health and wellbeing prospects for all children in Victoria, both now and across their lifespans into adulthood. GenV aims to better represent the diversity of all Victorian families in research, and in doing so we can begin addressing health inequalities that presently occur and persist both within and between different population groups in Victoria. 

“Every day with GenV is different and provides a rare, and privileged opportunity to meet with a diversity of families at the precious beginning of their baby’s life. A recent memorable day for me was having two sets of twins and their parents sign up to GenV in the one day! As the son of a twin, and as a public health practitioner, I’m quite interested in the value that twins can bring to research in helping us to better understand how genetics and environment work differently to effect variance in health and life outcomes.  I look forward to meeting with and reaching more families and to increasing the diversity of families able to be included in GenV as the project grows.