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Asthma research approached differently

A large, whole-of-state population health study like GenV has many priorities in terms of research that aims to create a happier and healthier future for Victorian children and parents. 

But how are these aims defined and furthered into impactful research?  

The GenV Solutions Hub drives this important work and is the ‘engine room’ of GenV’s impact. The Solutions Hub team have developed focus areas for research using GenV data, comprised of six defined areas that frequently impact children, parents, families and the community more broadly. 

One of these focus areas relates to allergy, immunity and infection, including common health problems like asthma, eczema and food allergies. 

GenV Senior Epidemiologist and Solutions Hub Co-Lead, Dr Yanhong Jessika Hu, said that GenV data will lead researchers to responsive, timely and innovative science and solutions to help solve problems like asthma. 

“Asthma is incredibly common, with around one in nine people and one in 10 children in Australia living with asthma. This is one of the highest rates in the world.”  

“Asthma impacts daily life for many families and in many cases limits children’s activities, keeping them from playing sports,” she said.  

Dr Hu said that as more and more families sign up to take part in GenV, the scope of the potential research and associated benefits to health and well-being were starting to become clear. 

 “GenV is keen to work with the allergy research team at Murdoch Children’s Research Institute to develop potential opportunities looking into asthma using GenV data.”  

 “GenV is keen to work with the allergy research team at Murdoch Children’s Research Institute to develop potential opportunities looking into asthma using GenV data.”  

 “Imagine the impact GenV could have on reducing the impact of asthma in children and adults if GenV data – from potentially 150,000 families across Victoria – is used for research which leads to new discoveries and solutions around the causes, treatment and prevention of asthma,” she said.